Tea of the Week – Jacksons Sencha Green Tea with Mint

I was standing in Waitrose this week pondering whether to buy this tea or the Dragonfly Moroccan Mint … this one won out due to being a) Fairtrade and b) 40p cheaper. So here we are:

Box of teaSource: “Jacksons Fairtrade green tea is sourced fro a group of farms in South East China …”. I bought this box from Waitrose, I suspect it’s available in other large supermarkets too. Jacksons’ website is being redone at the moment, so you can’t buy online direct from them (I’m not sure if you can normally, but I would guess you probably could).

Cost: The princely sum of £1.59 for 20 teabags. Which is great, especially as it comes in little individual sachets:

Tea sachet… which means that I can easily take it to things.

Ethics: Fairtrade 🙂
(ingredients: Fairtrade Sencha green tea, natural mint flavouring (10.5%), peppermint leaves (5%)). Also the box is made from at least 80% recycled materials, and is recyclable, and the teabags are 100% biodegradable (i.e. don’t have staples in them)

Brewing Instructions: Look at this!

Back of tea sachet with brewing instructionsit’s got reasonable brewing instructions!

Tea you buy in supermarkets almost never has reasonable brewing instructions!

I am disproportionately excited about this. Jacksons may end up being my new favourite brand.

Ahem. In case you can’t read it in the picture, the instructions given say:

“To preserve the delicate flavour of the leaves, use “just boiled” water and allow to stand for up to a minute and a half. If you prefer a stronger taste, leave to stand for longer, although no more than two minutes.”

This is excellent advice. I would suggest brewing it for a minute.

Appearance: a gorgeous golden yellow … they describe it as “a bright ginger-yellow liquor”, which is a remarkably good description. I hadn’t thought about ‘ginger-yellow’ as a colour before, but now that I have I see precisely what they mean.

Here’s a photo; the background’s a bit over-exposed but the tea really is this colour:
Tea! (mug of) showing golden yellow colour

Nose: Green and grassy, slightly sweet-smelling – this is from the mint, I think.

Taste: Grassy and bright, smooth. A really nice sencha, in my opinion (and I’m no expert) – ‘Sencha’ means that the tea has been steamed before drying (roughly speaking), which I think ferments it a tiny bit, and gives a distinctive depth of flavour.

Food match: I’ve no idea. I tried asking the internet what to eat when drinking Sencha Green Tea, and all that came up were lots of pages telling me how I could lose weight by drinking green tea … ah well. Any ideas? I’m sure there are people out there who can advise me … 🙂

What do you think? Leave me a comment 🙂 I like comments …

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4 Responses to Tea of the Week – Jacksons Sencha Green Tea with Mint

  1. Jade Carver says:

    This blows my mind a little bit. I can’t drink mint tea of any descriptions – it all tastes horrible to me. GREEN tea with mint? I can’t even begin to imagine what that would smell or taste like!

  2. Hmmm … what do you think of green tea? 🙂

    The green teas with mint that I’ve tried (this one and the Dragonfly one) definitely – to me, at least – taste of green tea with a little something to take the edge off and make it a touch sweeter (not that it’s sweet, just that it somehow tastes sweet-er) … rather than tasting of mint tea. Although I do like mint tea (well, some mint teas) so that’s not an issue for me.

    (How are you, btw?)

  3. Jade Carver says:

    Hmm… well, my particular favourite is green tea with jasmine, but I’ll drink anything that isn’t too strong/bitter. That being said… I might give mint green tea a go if I find some!

    (I’m pretty good! Just trying to find a holiday job so I can afford Christmas presents 😦 it’s a bit frustrating but I’ve been reading books and seeing friends in the meantime so I don’t go mad with boredom).

  4. Pingback: Tea Tea Tea … a retrospective | Eudoxia Friday : Thoughtful Eclecticism

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